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Eun-Seog Hong 2 Articles
Predictors of Anaphylactic Shock in Patients with Anaphylaxis after Exposure to Bee Venom
Hyung-Joo Kim, Sun-Hyu Kim, Hyoung-Do Park, Woo-Youn Kim, Eun-Seog Hong
J Korean Soc Clin Toxicol. 2010;8(1):30-36.   Published online June 30, 2010
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Purpose: The purpose of this study is to analyze the clinical characteristics of anaphylaxis and anaphylactic shock caused by bee venom. Methods: We retrospectively collected the data of the patients who experienced anaphylaxis caused by natural bee sting or acupuncture using bee venom from January 1999 to December 2008. Seventy subjects were divided into the shock and non-shock groups. The clinical characteristics, sources of bee venom, treatments and outcomes were compared between the two groups. Results: The mean age of the subjects was $45.5{pm}16.3$ years old and the number of males was 44 (62.9%). There were 25 patients in the shock group and 45 in the non-shock group. The age was older (p=0.001) and females (p=0.003) were more frequent in the shock group. Transportation to the hospital via ambulance was more frequent in the shock group (p<0.001). No difference was found in species of bee between the two groups. The cephalic area, including the face, was the most common area of bee venom in both groups. Anaphylaxis caused by bee sting commonly occurred between July and October. Cutaneous and respiratory symptoms were the most frequent symptoms related to anaphylaxis. Cardiovascular and neurologic symptoms were more frequent in the shock group. The amount of intravenously administered fluid and subcutaneous injection of epinephrine were much more in the shock group than that in the non-shock group. Conclusion: Older age was the factors related to anaphylactic shock caused by bee venom. Further validation is needed to evaluate the gender factor associated with shock.
Hydrogen Sulfide Poisoning
Young-Hee Choi, Byung-Kuk Nam, Hyo-Kyung Kim, Ji-Kang Park, Eun-Seog Hong, Yang-Ho Kim
J Korean Soc Clin Toxicol. 2004;2(1):31-36.   Published online June 30, 2004
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Three workers, field operators in lubricating oil processing of petroleum refinery industry were found unconscious by other worker. One of them who were exposed to an high concentration of H2S was presented with Glasgow Coma Score of 5, severe hypoxemia on arterial blood gas analysis, normal chest radiography, and normal blood pressure. On hospital day 7, his mental state became clear, and neurologic examination showed quadriparesis, profound spasticity, increased tendon reflexes, abnormal Babinski response, and bradykinesia. He was also found to have decreased memory, attention deficits and blunted affect which suggest general cognitive dysfunction, which improved soon. MRI scan showed abnormal signals in both basal ganglia and motor cortex, compatible with clinical findings of motor dysfunction. Neuropsychologic testing showed deficits of cognitive functions. SPECT showed markedly decreased cortical perfusion in frontotemporoparietal area with deep white matter. Another case was recovered completely, but the other expired the next day.

JKSCT : Journal of The Korean Society of Clinical Toxicology