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Sang-Chan Jin 5 Articles
Respiratory Failure following Tetramine poisoning after Ingestion of Sea Snail: A Case Report
Joo Hwan Lee, Jin Wook Park, Seong Jun Hong, Jae-Cheon Jeon, Sang-Chan Jin
J Korean Soc Clin Toxicol. 2020;18(1):42-46.   Published online June 30, 2020
DOI: https://doi.org/10.22537/jksct.2020.18.1.42
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Tetramine toxicity due to sea snail ingestion is generally mild and has a good prognosis. Tetramine toxicity acts on the acetylcholine receptor, affecting the neuromuscular junction and autonomic nervous system. A 78-year-old female patient visited the emergency room with vomiting and dyspnea after eating sea snails. At the time of admission, the vital signs recorded were 140/80 mmHg-105/min-24/min-36.5℃, and 90% oxygen saturation. Arterial blood test revealed hypercapnia (pCO2 58.2 mmHg) and respiratory acidosis (pH 7.213, HCO3- 22.5 mmol/L), whereas other blood tests showed no specific findings. Due to decreased consciousness and hypoxia, endotracheal intubation and mechanical ventilation were administered to the patient. Successful weaning was accomplished after 12 hrs, and the patient was discharged without any further complications. Although tetramine toxicity rarely results in acute respiratory failure due to paralysis of the respiratory muscle, caution is required whilst treating the patient.
Guillain-barré Syndrome after Multiple Bee Stings
Sang-Chan Jin
J Korean Soc Clin Toxicol. 2018;16(1):57-59.   Published online June 30, 2018
DOI: https://doi.org/10.22537/jksct.2018.16.1.57
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Severe systemic responses including neurologic complications such as myasthenia gravis, myeloradiculopathy, optic neuropathy, parkinsonism, stroke and Guillain-$barr{acute{e}}$ syndrome can occur after bee stings. This case describes a 78-year-old female who presented with symptoms of acute progressive bilateral symmetrical weakness in both lower legs after multiple bee stings. Nerve conduction study findings were consistent with acute sensorimotor axonal neuropathy and recovered by treatment with intravenous immunoglobulin. This case highlights that bee stings can result in acute onset Guillain-$barr{acute{e}}$ syndrome, although the pathophysiologies of bee venoms need to be investigated accurately.
Genoprotective Effect of Melatonin Against to the Genotoxicity of Glyphosate on Human Blood Lymphocytes
Jung-Gyu Kim, Woo-Ik Choi, Jae-Ho Lee, In-Jang Choi, Sang-Chan Jin
J Korean Soc Clin Toxicol. 2016;14(2):144-150.   Published online December 31, 2016
DOI: https://doi.org/10.22537/jksct.2016.14.2.144
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Purpose: Glyphosate is a widely used non-selective herbicide. Previous studies have shown that glyphosate has genotoxicity, and that even low-doses of glyphosate can cause DNA damage. Melatonin is a hormone produced and secreted by the pineal gland that is known to be a potent anti-carcinogen, anti-oxidant, and genetic protector. This study was conducted to investigate the genoprotective effect of melatonin against glyphosate in human blood lymphocytes. Methods: Human peripheral blood was obtained from 15 young, healthy volunteers and cultured under four different toxicologic conditions. The four groups consisted of a control group, glyphosate only group (300 ng/mL), glyphosate with low level of melatonin group ($50{mu}M$), and glyphosate with high level of melatonin group ($200{mu}M$). The mean Sister Chromatid Exchange (SCE) frequency of each group was then analyzed. Results: Glyphosate exposed groups had a higher mean SCE frequency ($10.33{pm}2.50$) than the control group ($6.78{pm}2.31$, p<0.001). Interestingly, the group that received a low-level of melatonin had a lower mean SCE frequency ($8.67{pm}2.58$) than the glyphosate-only group, while the group that received a high level of melatonin had a much lower mean SCE frequency ($8.06{pm}2.50$) than the glyphosate-only group. There was statistical significance. Conclusion: Melatonin exerted a potent gene protective effect against the genotoxicity of glyphosate on human blood lymphocytes in a dose-dependent fashion.
In vitro Effects of Epigallocatechin Gallate on Sister Chromatid Exchange in the Lymphocytes Exposed to Glyphosate
Jung-Min Park, Woo-Ik Choi, Sang-Chan Jin, Jae-Ho Lee, In-Jang Choi
J Korean Soc Clin Toxicol. 2016;14(2):78-82.   Published online December 31, 2016
DOI: https://doi.org/10.22537/jksct.2016.14.2.78
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Purpose: Green tea is known as a potent anti-oxidant, anti-carcinogen, and genetic protector. Glyphosate (N-phosphonomethyl glycine) is a widely used non-selective herbicide that causes DNA damage. The present study was conducted to investigate the protective effects of green tea in human blood lymphocytes exposed to glyphosate using the Sister Chromatid Exchange (SCE) frequency method. Methods: Peripheral blood was obtained from 10 volunteers and cultured through four different conditions. Four groups were divided into control, glyphosate only (300 ng/mL), glyphosate and low ($20{mu}m$) concentrations of epigallocatechin gallate (EGCG) and glyphosate and high ($100{mu}m$) concentrations of EGCG. Results: The glyphosate exposed groups had a higher mean SCE frequency ($10.33{pm}2.50$) than the control group ($6.38{pm}2.28$, p<0.001). The low concentrations of EGCG groups had a lower mean SCE frequency ($9.91{pm}1.93$) than the glyphosate-only group, although this difference was not significant (p=0.219). However, the high concentration group ($9.49{pm}1.85$) had a significantly lower SCE frequency than the glyphosate-only group (p=0.001). Conclusion: EGCG has a gene protective effect in human lymphocytes exposed to the genotoxicity of glyphosate in the case of high concentrations.
A Case of Trichloroethylene Poisoning
Jae-Cheon Jean, Sung-Won Jang, Seung-Joan Yang, Jae-Won Lee, Sang-Chan Jin, Myeong-Don Joo, Woo-Ik Choi
J Korean Soc Clin Toxicol. 2007;5(1):61-66.   Published online June 30, 2007
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Trichloroethylene (TCE) is an unsaturated chlorinated hydrocarbon in the form of a colorless, volatile liquid, which is used as an industrial organic solvent for spot removal and for metal degreasing. In general, the primary complications of TCE poisoning result from involvement of the central nervous and respiratory systems, including aspiration pneumonia. A case is reported of a 54-year-old man who presented in a comatose state after accidental ingestion of 100 ml of TCE, and who recovered after conservative treatment and mechanical ventilation. We discuss this case and present a literature review.

JKSCT : Journal of The Korean Society of Clinical Toxicology