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Young Hwan Lee 3 Articles
Association between Smoking and Delayed Neuropsychological Sequelae in Acute Carbon Monoxide Poisoning
Hak Myeon Kim, Sung Woo Choi, Sang Un Nah, Hyo Jeong Choi, Hoon Lim, Gi Woon Kim, Sang Soo Han, Young Hwan Lee
J Korean Soc Clin Toxicol. 2018;16(2):102-107.   Published online December 31, 2018
DOI: https://doi.org/10.22537/jksct.2018.16.2.102
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Purpose: This study examined the association between smoking and delayed neuropsychological sequelae (DNS) in acute carbon monoxide (CO) poisoning. Methods: Patients admitted to the medical center emergency department from March 2016 to March 2017 because of CO poisoning were examined retrospectively. The patients were divided into two groups: DNS and Non-DNS group. Multiple factors were analyzed to explain DNS, which was assessed by motor disturbances, cognitive impairment, dysphagia, Parkinson-like syndromes, epilepsy, and emotional lability in CO poisoning. Results: A total of 120 patients were included. The factors related to DNS were smoking (pack-years) (p=0.002) and initial carbon monoxide-hemoglobin level (p=0.015). On the other hand, after multivariate logistic regression analysis, smoking (Odds ratio 1.07; 95% CI, 1.02-1.13; p=0.004) was the only factor associated with DNS. Conclusion: Smoking is a very reliable factor for predicting the occurrence of DNS. A history of smoking in patients who suffer from CO intoxication is important. If a patient smokes, treatment should be started actively and as soon as possible.
Effect of Alcohol on Death Rate in Organophosphate Poisoned Patients
Yong Hun Min, Seung Min Park, Kui Ja Lee, Young Taeck Oh, Hee Cheol Ahn, You Dong Sohn, Ji Yun Ahn, Young Hwan Lee, Sang Ook Ha, Yu Jung Kim
J Korean Soc Clin Toxicol. 2015;13(1):19-24.   Published online June 30, 2015
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Purpose: Many patients who are acutely poisoned with organophosphorus pesticides have co-ingested alcohol. The purpose of this study was to identify the factors that influence mortality in organophosphate intoxication and the differences between alcohol coingested patients and non-coingested patients, looking at vital signs, length of admission, cholinesterase activity, complications, and mortality. Methods: All patients visiting one Emergency Department (ED) with organophosphate intoxication between January 2000 and December 2012 were reviewed retrospectively. The patients were divided into two groups, alcohol coingested group and non-coingested group. Results: During the study period, 136 patients (alcohol coingested group, 95 patients; non-coingested group, 41 patients) presented to the ED with organophosphate intoxication. Seventy-one alcohol coingested patients (74.1%) vs. 16 non-coingested patients (39.0%) received endotracheal intubation, with results of the analysis showing a clear distinction between the two groups (p=0.001). Twenty-three alcohol coingested patients (24.2%) vs. 1 non-coingested patient (2.4%) required inotropics, indicating a significant gap (p=0.002). Twenty-eight alcohol coingested patients (29.5%) vs. 2 non-coingested patients (4.9%) died, with results of the analysis showing a clear distinction between the two groups (p=0.002). Conclusion: In cases of organophosphate intoxication, alcohol coingested patients tended to receive endotracheal intubation, went into shock, developed central nervous system complications, and more died.
Correlation between the Portable X-ray and the Radiation Exposure dose in the Emergency Department: Cohort Study
Yu Jung Kim, Hee Cheol Ahn, You Dong Sohn, Ji Yoon Ahn, Seung Min Park, Won Woong Lee, Young Hwan Lee
J Korean Soc Clin Toxicol. 2013;11(2):101-105.   Published online December 31, 2013
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Purpose: This study was conducted in order to determine the relationship between the number of portable X-rays and the radiation exposure dose for emergency medical service providers working in the emergency department (ED). Methods: A prospective study was conducted from February 15, 2013 to May 15, 2013 in the ED in an urban hospital. Six residents, seven emergency medical technicians (EMT), and 24 nurses were enrolled. They wore a personal radiation dosimeter on their upper chest while working in the ED, and they stayed away from the portable X-ray unit at a distance of at least 1.8 m when the X-ray beam was generated. Results: The total number of portable x-rays was 2089. The average total radiation exposure dose of emergency medical service providers was $0.504{pm}0.037$ mSv, and it was highest in the EMT group, 0.85(0.58-1.08) mSv. The average of the total number of portable X-rays was highest in the doctor group, 728.5(657.25-809). The relationship between the number of portable X-rays and the radiation exposure dose was not statistically significant(-0.186, p=0.269). Conclusion: Under the condition of staying away from the portable X-ray unit at a distance of least 1.8 m, the relationship between the number of portable X-rays and the radiation exposure dose was not statistically significant.

JKSCT : Journal of The Korean Society of Clinical Toxicology