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HOME > J Korean Soc Clin Toxicol > Volume 5(2); 2007 > Article
Survey of the Antidote Stocking in the Emergency Medical Centers in Korea
Je-Sung You, Eui-Chung Kim, Hahn-Shick Lee, Seung-Ho Kim, Sung-Pil Chung
Journal of The Korean Society of Clinical Toxicology 2007;5(2):106-111
DOI: https://doi.org/
Published online: December 31, 2007
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1Ulsan Fire Department Headquarters
2Department of Emergency Medicine, Yonsei University College of Medicine
3Department of Emergency Medicine, Yonsei University College of Medicine
4Department of Emergency Medicine, Yonsei University College of Medicine
5Department of Emergency Medicine, Yonsei University College of Medicine

Purpose: Inadequate hospital stocking and unavailability of essential antidotes is a worldwide problem. The purpose of this study was to determine the adequacy of antidote stocks in Korean hospitals based on a modified version of US antidote stocking guidelines. Methods: Both written and telephone surveys to collect information on hospital demographics and antidote stocking were given to the emergency departments or hospital pharmacies of 117 hospitals with emergency medical centers. The twenty antidotes included in the survey were taken from year 2000 US antidote stocking guidelines, except for activated charcoal and black widow spider antivenin. Antidote stocks were compared by hospital size, geographic location, and type of emergency medical center. Results: Complete responses were received from all hospitals. A mean of $12.4{pm}2.9$ antidotes were adequately stocked per hospital. All hospitals stocked atropine, $CaCl_2$ naloxone, and sodium bicarbonate. However, digoxin Fab fragment (16%), cyanide kits (15%), EDTA (10%), BAL (9%), and fomepizole (1%) were not uniformly stocked. Large and teaching hospitals were significantly more likely to stock greater numbers of antidotes. Conclusions: Korean hospitals as a group do not have adequate antidote stocks. Korean stocking guidelines and an antidote management system are recommended in order to correct these deficiencies.

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JKSCT : Journal of The Korean Society of Clinical Toxicology