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HOME > J Korean Soc Clin Toxicol > Volume 11(2); 2013 > Article
Measurement of Volume of a Swallow for Liquid Swallowing in Healthy Young Adults
Su Ik Kim, Ji Hun Kang, Dong Ik Lee, Jeong Ryul Jo, Hyung Jun Kim, Jae Baek Lee, Young Ho Jin, Tae Oh Jeong, Jae Chol Yoon
Journal of The Korean Society of Clinical Toxicology 2013;11(2):114-118
DOI: https://doi.org/
Published online: December 31, 2013
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1Department of Emergency Medicine, University of Seonam College of Medicine, Presbyterian Medical Center
2Department of Emergency Medicine, University of Seonam College of Medicine, Presbyterian Medical Center
3Department of Emergency Medicine, University of Seonam College of Medicine, Presbyterian Medical Center
4Department of Emergency Medicine, University of Seonam College of Medicine, Presbyterian Medical Center
5Department of Emergency Medicine, University of Seonam College of Medicine, Presbyterian Medical Center
6Department of Emergency Medicine, Medical School, Chonbuk National University
7Department of Emergency Medicine, Medical School, Chonbuk National University
8Department of Emergency Medicine, Medical School, Chonbuk National University
9Department of Emergency Medicine, Medical School, Chonbuk National University

Purpose: The aim of this study is to estimate one mouthful volume in a single swallow and average volume per swallow (AVS) in multiple swallows in the situation of toxic liquid poisoning. Methods: Thirty five men and 35 women were included in this study. Each subject was asked to drink one swallow and three consecutive swallows from bottle containing water and a bottle containing saline separately. We calculated one mouthful volume in a single swallow and AVS in three swallows. One mouthful volume and AVS were compared according to sex and content, respectively. One mouthful volume of water and saline was then compared with AVS of each. Results: Sixty seven adults(34 men; $26.9{pm}3.2$ years, 33 women; $25.6{pm}2.4$ years) completed the study. Men had larger one mouthful volume of water($49.1{pm}19.9$ ml vs $39.7{pm}10.2$ ml, p=0.02) and saline($20.7{pm}10.9$ ml vs $14.0{pm}4.6$ ml, p=0.004) and AVS of water($28.5{pm}11.9$ ml vs $21.5{pm}5.9$ ml, p=0.004) and saline($11.9{pm}6.3$ ml vs $7.9{pm}2.0$ ml, p=0.001) than women. One mouthful volume and AVS of saline swallow were lower than those of water swallow. AVS of three consecutive swallows was lower than one mouthful volume in water and saline swallow. Conclusion: We suggest that one mouthful volume in a single swallow is 21 ml in men and 14 ml in women and AVS in multiple swallows is 12 ml in men and 8 ml in women. AVS in multiple swallows is two-threefold lower than reference values(20~30 ml) commonly used in poisoning study.

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JKSCT : Journal of The Korean Society of Clinical Toxicology