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HOME > J Korean Soc Clin Toxicol > Volume 11(2); 2013 > Article
Clinical Analysis of Patients with Cardiotoxicity Caused by Himalayan Mad Honey
Sung Ho Kim, Dong Woo Seo, Seung Mok Ryoo, Won Young Kim, Bum Jin Oh, Kyoung Soo Lim, Chang Hwan Sohn
Journal of The Korean Society of Clinical Toxicology 2013;11(2):119-126
DOI: https://doi.org/
Published online: December 31, 2013
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1Department of Emergency Medicine, University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Asan Medical Center
2Department of Emergency Medicine, University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Asan Medical Center
3Department of Emergency Medicine, University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Asan Medical Center
4Department of Emergency Medicine, University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Asan Medical Center
5Department of Emergency Medicine, University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Asan Medical Center
6Department of Emergency Medicine, University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Asan Medical Center
7Department of Emergency Medicine, University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Asan Medical Center

Purpose: The aim of this study was to evaluate the clinical characteristics and outcome of patients who presented to the emergency department (ED) with cardiotoxicity caused by ingestion of Himalayan mad honey. Methods: Medical records of 12 patients who presented to the ED from January 1, 2005 to December 31, 2012 with cardiotoxicity caused by ingestion of Himalayan mad honey were retrospectively reviewed. Results: The mean age of patients was 54.5 years and 58.3% were men. The median amount of mad honey ingested was 30.0 cc, and the mean time from ingestion to onset of symptoms was 39.4 minutes. All patients had hypotension and bradycardia upon arrival in the ED. The initial electrocardiogram showed sinus bradycardia in seven patients, junctional bradycardia in four patients, and atrial fibrillation with slow ventricular response in one patient. Four patients were treated with intravenous normal saline solution only. Eight patients were treated with intravenous normal saline solution and atropine sulfate in a dose ranging from 0.5 to 2.0 mg. Blood pressure and pulse rate returned to normal limits within 24 hours in all patients. Conclusion: Our study showed that all patients with cardiotoxicity caused by ingestion of Himalayan mad honey had severe hypotension, bradycardia, and bradyarrythmias, including sinus bradycardia and junctional bradycardia and all patients responded well to conservative treatment, including intravenous normal saline solution and intravenous atropine sulfate.

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JKSCT : Journal of The Korean Society of Clinical Toxicology