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HOME > J Korean Soc Clin Toxicol > Volume 15(2); 2017 > Article
In vitro Protective Effects of Glehnia Littoralis on Alpha-amanitin Induced Hepatotoxicity
Bo Hyun Kim, Kyung Hoon Sun, Sun Pyo Kim, Yongjin Park
Journal of The Korean Society of Clinical Toxicology 2017;15(2):107-115
DOI: https://doi.org/10.22537/jksct.2017.15.2.107
Published online: December 31, 2017
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1Department of Emergency Medicine, School of Medicine, Chosun University
2Department of Emergency Medicine, School of Medicine, Chosun University
3Department of Emergency Medicine, School of Medicine, Chosun University
4Department of Emergency Medicine, School of Medicine, Chosun University

Purpose: Glehnia littoralis has been used to treat ischemic stroke, phlegm, cough, systemic paralysis, antipyretics and neuralgia. The pharmacological mechanisms of Glehnia littoralis include calcium channel block, coumarin derivatives, anticoagulation, anti-convulsive effect, as well as anti-oxidant and anti-inflammatory effects. Alpha-amanitin (${alpha}$-amanitin) is a major toxin from extremely poisonous Amanita fungi. Oxidative stress, which may contribute to severe hepatotoxicity was induced by ${alpha}$-amanitin. The aim of this study was to investigate whether Glehnia littoralis ethyl acetate extract (GLEA) has the protective antioxidant effects on ${alpha}$-amanitin -induced hepatotoxicity. Methods: Human hepatoma cell line HepG2 cells were pretreated in the presence or absence of GLEA (50, 100 and $200{mu}g/ml$) for 4 hours, then exposed to $60{mu}mol/L$ of${alpha}$-amanitin for an additional 4 hours. Cell viability was evaluated using the MTT method. AST, ALT, and LDH production in a culture medium and intracellular MDA, GSH, and SOD levels were determined. Results: GLEA (50, 100 and $200{mu}g/ml$) significantly increased the relative cell viability by 7.11, 9.87, and 14.39%, respectively, and reduced the level of ALT by 10.39%, 34.27%, and 52.14%, AST by 9.89%, 15.16%, and 32.84%, as well as LDH by 15.86%, 22.98%, and 24.32% in culture medium, respectively. GLEA could also remarkably decrease the level of MDA and increase the content of GSH and SOD in the HepG2 cells. Conclusion: In the in vitro model, Glehnia littoralis was effective in limiting hepatic injury after ${alpha}$-amanitin poisoning. Its antioxidant effect is attenuated by antidotal therapy.

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JKSCT : Journal of The Korean Society of Clinical Toxicology