Skip Navigation
Skip to contents

JKSCT : Journal of The Korean Society of Clinical Toxicology

OPEN ACCESS
SEARCH
Search

Articles

Page Path
HOME > J Korean Soc Clin Toxicol > Volume 19(2); 2021 > Article
Effect on blood heavy metal concentration in gas poisoning by combustion of ignition coal: Pilot study
Sang Hwan Lee, Juncheol Lee, Yongil Cho, Byuk Sung Ko, Jaehoon Oh, Hyunggoo Kang
Journal of The Korean Society of Clinical Toxicology 2021;19(2):127-132
DOI: https://doi.org/10.22537/jksct.2021.19.2.127
Published online: December 31, 2021
  • 136 Views
  • 1 Download
  • 0 Crossref
  • 0 Scopus
1Department of Emergency Medicine, College of Medicine, Hanyang University
2Department of Emergency Medicine, College of Medicine, Hanyang University
3Department of Emergency Medicine, College of Medicine, Hanyang University
4Department of Emergency Medicine, College of Medicine, Hanyang University
5Department of Emergency Medicine, College of Medicine, Hanyang University
6Department of Emergency Medicine, College of Medicine, Hanyang University

Purpose: It is known that the most common cause of gas poisoning in Korea is suicide attempts by burning ignition coals. Ignition coals are made from waste wood, and studies have been reported that heavy metals are emitted when this coal is burned. However, there was no study on how much heavy metal poisoning occurs in the human body through this, so this study was planned to find out whether the concentration of heavy metals in the blood increased in patients exposed to ignition coal combustion. Methods: From April 2020 to April 2021, blood lead, mercury, and cadmium concentrations were investigated in carbon monoxide poisoning patients who visited one regional emergency medical center in Seoul, and their association with exposure time, source of poisoning, and rhabdomyolysis were investigated. Results: During the study period, a total of 136 carbon monoxide poisoning patients were tested for heavy metals, and 81 cases of poisoning by ignition coal were reported. When comparing poisoning caused by combustion of ignition coal and other substances, there was no difference in the concentrations of lead, mercury, and cadmium in the blood, and there was no difference in the number of patients above the reference range. However, the patients exposed to more than 5 hours of ignition coal gas exposure are more frequent than those in the group less than 5 hours in lead (51.4% vs. 23.9%, p=0.012). Conclusion: Compared to poisoning with other combustible substances, the blood concentration of lead, mercury, and cadmium does not increase further in patients with gas poisoning by ignition coal. However, prolonged exposure may result in elevated levels of lead.

Related articles

JKSCT : Journal of The Korean Society of Clinical Toxicology